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Petition Tag - recycle

1. Heartland Recycles

Break free from your office garbage can! Support recycling at Heartland and opt to remove your garbage can from your office and only recycle.

Studies have shown that when recycling cans are most convenient, recycling rates increase.

Help Heartland increase our recycling rates and eliminate recyclables from entering our landfill.

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2. Re-Shirt Campaign

Re-Shirt is a campaign which aims to reduce the number of promotional T-shirts that Universities and companies across the country are wasting.

Thousands of T-shirts are printed across the United Kingdom for "one time wear" and we want to put a stop to this.

Have you ever been given a promotional T-shirt?

Have you ever been in charge of printing promotional T-shirts?

Sign our pledge to state that you will think more about the impact you are having.

Reduce. Reuse. Recycle.

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3. Allow Applications for Large Waste Black Bins

I have recently asked the Environment and Highways scrutiny Committee of Neath Port Talbot to support an application system to allow Large Families and Other Families who I believe would qualify for the use of a larger Black Waste Bin to allow them to demonstrate with evidence their need for this application system for all.

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4. Support Recycling Incentives

Recycling is important to protect our environment from becoming polluted and filled with toxic waste.

Recycling is key to keeping our air clean, and reducing greenhouse gases.

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5. Ban Plastic Bags in La Jolla!

Help raise awareness of plastic and how it effects our environment!

Los Angeles County has been the first county in California to ban plastic bags, so why can't San Diego or specifically La Jolla?

We live in such a BEAUTIFUL beach community and it's sad to see our local markets using plastic bags!

Help the oceans and ban plastic bags!

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6. Yes to Recycling

I have promoted Recycling by giving out posters and leaflets about it.

I have started a petition in my school community and hopefully i can start online.

I have been round to local estates and have done sessions with young adults who I believe need to take care of the environment.

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7. Feasibility Study for Sydney's 'Hi-Lane'

On the 21st of April 2012 Sydney Morning Herald published a preliminary concept proposal for the conversion of Sydney's monorail line into a public walkway.

In the days following there has been a great deal of public debate online exploring the merits of the proposal. Much of the commentary has been positive and hence we think it is appropriate that the N.S.W. Government and the City of Sydney undertake a feasibility study to explore the potential conversion of the monorail into a walkway.

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8. Composting for Amherstview

Composting not only helps put fewer material into landfills, which prevents pollution, it also can be reused for agriculture purposes and sold as a natural fertilizer.

Kingston, Ontario already has a green bin for every household which is picked up weekly. Organic materials go in these green bins.

Amherstview is already included in recycle and garbage pick up, so green bins could be done at the same time as well.

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9. Recycle Cape Town

Dinner time! On this winter’s eve you decide to make for yourself tomato soup. You start with two cans of tomato base, followed by a container of baby tomatoes, and finish it with a container of cream. As an environmentally conscious person you plan to recycle the two metal cans containing your base, the plastic container housing the tomatoes, and the small plastic container holding your cream. You separate these from your true waste and put them in a small bag destined for the recycling plant.

When it comes time for you to take out the trash you realize you have no idea where to dispose of your recycling collection. It’s easy enough to dispose of your true waste as every street has an abundance of bins destined for disposal at the nearest land fill. So where to put the recycling?

Still having a heart for the environment, you hold on to your small recycling bag. As bowls of tomato soup go by, your recycling bag grows bigger. After enough time this recycling bag has turned into an obtrusive structure in your home.

You realize that in the year 2009/2010 the city of Cape Town produced 1.6 million tons of waste! You’ve read on the City Of Cape Town’s Solid Waste Department’s website that of the six plots of land surrounding the city for land fill, only three are left and they are “quickly filling up.” You don’t want to contribute unnecessarily to the mountains off trash surrounding your beloved city!

Before too long you discover that there are actually twenty drop off sites for your recycling, placed not so strategically throughout the city. After driving to one of these spots you realize that recycling in the city of Cape Town is actually a not-so-efficient way of disposing of your waste. Even further, you realize that none of these drop-off sites are funded by the city’s government. In fact, all recycling drop off points in the city of Cape Town are privately funded. This simple fact is a testament to the heart of the people in this city.

That the city’s waste department can’t afford proper recycling provisions is a fallacy. More of our tax dollars go to funding “company holidays” and lavish private “conferences” than to bettering the life of those in the community. Is it not a simple enough suggestion to propose that everywhere there is a trash bin in the city destined for the land fill, right next to it sits one destined for the recycling plant?

It’s time we demand that our government take more responsibility for recycling in Cape Town. With the government’s funds behind it, recycling can become a simple, everyday activity in our lives.

Recycling is actually an inexpensive option to the statistics of our waste tonnage that will benefit the city by creating jobs and minimizing our waste, and the world at large, by preventing the need to extract resources from our planet only to bury them shortly thereafter in a landfill.

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10. Save the weekly grey bin rubbish collection service in Bury

Many local people living in the Bury Council area are opposed to council plans to abolish their weekly Grey Bin collection service.

Labour councillors want to save the weekly grey bin rubbish collection service to keep their areas clean, tidy and free of litter, stop rubbish piling up in streets and gardens, and prevent fly tipping.

Local people have told us they also want to recycle more by increasing the frequency of the green bin collections and the frequency of the glass bin collections.

We want to collect signatures for this petition to force Bury Council not to axe the weekly rubbish collection service and to help local people to recycle more by the frequency of the green bin collections and the frequency of the glass bin collections.

Thank you for your support.





See http://menmedia.co.uk/prestwichadvertiser/news/s/1455450_residents-battle-to-save-their-bins

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11. Collect The Brown Recycling Bins Three Times A Week

We used to have the Brown Bins collected every two weeks, this has now been increased to four times a week, with a limit now enforced on general household waste this means we now have to recycle a lot more.

This in itself is a good idea but we have not been given the facilities to accommodate this increase in recyclable waste leaving many of us with an overspill which the council will not collect.

I am calling for people to sign this petition who want the Brown Bins collected more frequently, to prevent the build-up of unsightly waste, and to stop us, the residents, having to take time out of busy schedules to take waste to landfill and recycle centres at our own fuel and time costs.

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12. Pi Lambda Phi Green Week

Green Living is defined herein as any action or activity that results in a positive impact, to any degree, on the environment so that the planet may continue to support future generations.

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13. Say NO to Plastic Bags!!

Plastic last forever and it's KILLS!

Used plastic bags, bottles and similar are finding their ways to our drains, rivers, sea, beaches and the big oceans.

These products made from plastic will never decomposed but will only broken into smaller pieces to be mistakenly consumed by the marine creatures...

The marine life are either choke or stave them to death by these mistaken food... or its find their ways into our food chain...

With the ever increasing of the population tag with the current consumers' habits, the volume of discarded plastic bags, bottles or others will increased to an alarming situation that will be beyond our ability to clean it up...

There are already numerous reports about garbages patches found in our ocean and more than 80% of the contents are plastics. These plastics are destroying and killing the marine life direct and indirectly, we human will be affected...

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14. Μείωσε, Eπαναχρησιμοποίησε, Ανακύκλωσε (Reduce, reuse, recycle)

Το περιβάλλον μας καταστρέφεται.
Όλοι μπορούμε να αγωνιστούμε για την προστασία του. Με απλές καθημερινές κινήσεις.

Πρέπει να στείλουμε ένα μήνυμα στο Δήμο μας, στην περιφέρειά μας, στο ΥΠΟΥΡΓΕΙΟ ΠΕΡΙΒΑΛΛΟΝΤΟΣ ΕΝΕΡΓΕΙΑΣ & ΚΛΙΜΑΤΙΚΗΣ ΑΛΛΑΓΗΣ, στο κράτος μας ότι νοιαζόμαστε.

Πρέπει να υποστηριχθούν οι σχετικές δράσεις που γίνονται από σχολεία, πολίτες, πολιτεία, ΜΚΟ, κ.λ.π..

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15. Save St Annes Tip (Everest Road Household Waste Recycling Centre in St Annes)

The St Annes recycling centre is the 5th. most popular recycle site in Lancashire (out of 23 sites spread across Lancashire)



Last year you helped to recycle/reuse 75.86% of the rubbish brought into this centre - please help fight its planned closure.



If the centre closes then potentially fly tipping council increase and recycling rates could go down.)



The closure proposals are part of a county-wide review of household waste recycling centres by Lancashire County Council, which claim the county has more tips compared to the population than any other area in the country.

Fears have been raised that fly-tipping could increase if the closure, labelled a "cost-cutting measure" by protesters, goes ahead.

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16. Stop Plastic Pollution

We go through 380 billion plastic bags a year. An estimated 5.2% get recycled; in landfills, they could last 1,000 years. Bags are made from oil, and our bag habit costs us 1.6 billion gallons of oil each year. That last statistic, and its link to global warming, is starting to drive change.

The new bags are expensive--they cost between 5 and 10 cents apiece, while plastic costs between 1 and 4 cents. But the big downside to these bags is that they decompose only in a commercial composting facility, which most cities don't have. Within the dry confines of a landfill, compostable bags will act just like plastic, And they don't decompose in ocean water, creating a giant toilet that doesn't flush.

Target bags list 10 ideas for reuse, letting the company lean green by asking customers to do their bit for the earth. Among the suggestions: "tiny trash-can liner" (#1), kitty-litter liner (#8), and tomorrow's lunch bag (#9). There are no incentives to reduce bag use, though; the bags suggest that you're cool if you reuse them.

That's not recycling and how many people actually read the bags?
http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/119/moneybags.html

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17. Encouraging Fast Food Restaurants and Outlets to Provide Recycling Facilities for Consumers

For many years Australians have been among the most enthusiastic recyclers in the world, however most fast food restaurants and outlets in Australia do not recycle or even offer customers the opportunity to recycle their waste. Furthermore, the majority of waste products from fast food meals including cups, bottles, aluminium cans, cardboard chip packets and paper wrappers, are fully recyclable but are being placed into landfill.

According to an academic study conducted in 2007 by the Lappeenranta University of Technology in Finland, waste generated by the packaging of fast food is 93% recoverable, in other words only 7% need go to landfill. The reality is that industry-wide only 29% is actually recovered with 71% of mostly recyclable packaging waste from the fast food industy going to landfill.

The research from this study indicated that it is possible to reach the achievable recovery potential in the exisiting solid waste infrastructure through new waste management practices, which are designed and operated according to waste producers's needs and demands. A consistent government approach is believed by the study to greatly assist in achieving lower waste, like in Taiwan.

In Taiwan, legislation was passed in 2004 that required its 600 fast-food restaurants, including McDonalds, Burger King (Hungry Jacks), and KFC, to maintain facilities for proper disposal of recyclables by customers. Diners are obliged to deposit their garbage in four separate containers for leftover food, recyclable paper, regular waste and liquids. Restaurants that don't comply face fines up to USD$8,700.

In March/April 2010, this petition will be forwarded to the head offices/CEOs of the most popular restaurants including McDonald's, Hungry Jacks, Burger King, Subway, KFC and Red Rooster etc. Copies of the petition will also be sent to the federal and state environment ministers to encourage the government to introduce legislative changes that encourage fast food franchises to adopt more environmentally friendly practices.

Most of the information in this petition was sourced from www.thegreenpages.com.au

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18. Stop landfills

Waste and rubbish dumped in landfills can take up to 500 years to degrade.

The only way to stop filling up our planet with rubbish is to be careful about what we throw away.

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19. STOP printed Phone directories

28.4 million Yellow Pages per year (official)
22 million Thomson Local per year (official)

How many are used? and at what environmental cost?

This delivery system comes with at massive environmental cost. Not only with the printing and paper used but with the distribution to every home and business.

How many of use just pick them up and put them straight in the bin? or save them and never use them.

With Global Warming being such a huge problem its time to stop this system of waste. We need to create an 'op-in' delivery program. This is we the printed versions are only delivered upon request therefore eliminating pointless waste.

Join this Protest and help us to live in an environmentally cleaner UK.

This is the first protest from 'The Waste Project'. A project looking for a sustainable world.

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20. Stop Styrofoam Usage

- Takes longer than a normal life-span to decompose.

- It is highly used at this moment, but should be stopped!

If you do use it, PLEASE recycle it. (:

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21. "Bring Your Own Bag Everyday" Campaign for all Local Retailers

NEA started the Bring Your Own Bag Day (BYOBD) since 2007. It started with every first Wednesday of the month to the current every Wednesday of the week. Most Singaporeans try to avoid patronizing participating supermarkets on Wednesday which defeat the purpose of BYOB or Stop the Wastage of Plastic Bags campaign.

Upon my last trip to GuaugZhou (广洲) I noticed the locals Bring Your Own Bag campaign is as successful as Korea. Most of the retail outlets do not provide carrier unless with a fee. I see all citizens with recycle bags whenever they are out to shop. I was not spared too. Regardless of buying of groceries, apparels or even books almost everything it’s Bring Your Own Bag.

Can we Singapore move towards this direction? I love Singapore, I love the Earth, and I love the planet we are in. I am sure I am not alone. May we help to keep the beautiful earth we are in and preserve it as much as possible for our next and future generations?
Did You Know...?
• More than 2.5 billion plastic bags are used every year in Singapore.
• Almost half of these bags are given away unnecessary such as customers asked for more than required.
• Plastic bags suffocate, disable and kill thousands of marine mammals and sea birds worldwide each year. When the animal dies and decays, the plastic bag is free again to repeat the deadly cycle.
• It only takes less than a week for an average Singapore family to accumulate 50 plastic bags.
• Most of these recyclable plastic bags are often thrown away without being recycled.
• Plastic bags thrown away as litter, dirty our public places, rivers and canals, and may even clog up drains, and this would lead to stagnant water and mosquito breeding.
• By using reusable bags during our shopping trips, we will use fewer plastic bags and help to conserve the earth's resources.
• We can help to put an end to this earth destruction.
• Say "NO" to plastic bags now!
• Say "YES" to less waste, haze and global warming.

What Price Have We Paid? We pay a big price for using plastic bags extensively – from the devastation they cause to our uniquely island environment, to the financial cost to the retail sector of supplying plastic bags to customers…the price we pay for using plastic bags really adds up.
Plastic bags are a serious threat to our environment and natural resources they take up to 1000 years to break down.

Plastic bags are responsible for blocking drains and harming our wildlife - both marine and land-based animals. Plastic bags are often mistaken as food by marine mammals. 100,000 marine mammals die yearly by eating plastic bags. These animals suffer a painful death, the plastic wraps around their intestines or they choke to death. We Murdered Them with plastic! And we are murdering our future generations too!

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22. Review plastic packaging for food

The ongoing and expanding use of preformed plastic containers, which are mostly grossly oversized for the enclosed product and used for foods being sold by retailers is both unnecessary and dangerous to our health.

I have had many 'Bag for Life' bags destroyed after a single use by the sharp edges, plus many cuts to my hands. Why use such a dangerous item? Why should the container be on average 3 times the size it needs to be for the content?

Considering that this type of rigid plastic is not recyclable it is certainly not in the interests of society in general!

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23. Stop Global Warming

Climate change may be a big problem, but there are many little things we can do to make a difference. If we try, most of us can do our part to reduce the amount of greenhouse gases that we put into the atmosphere. Many greenhouse gases come from things we do every day. As we have learned, these greenhouse gases trap energy in the atmosphere and make the Earth warmer.

Driving a car or using electricity is not wrong. We just have to be smart about it.Some people use less energy by carpooling. For example, four people can ride together in one car instead of driving four cars to work. Here are some additional ways you can help make the planet a better place!

Read
Learning about the environment is very important. There are many good books that will help you learn. To get started, ask a teacher or a librarian for some suggestions. You also can look at the Links page to find other good web sites with information about the environment and climate change.


Save Electricity
Whenever we use electricity, we help put greenhouse gases into the air. By turning off lights, the television, and the computer when you are through with them, you can help a lot.


Bike, Bus, and Walk
You can save energy by sometimes taking the bus, riding a bike, or walking.


Talk to Your Family and Friends
Talk with your family and friends about climate change. Let them know what you've learned.


Plant Trees
Planting trees is fun and a great way to reduce greenhouse gases. Trees absorb carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, from the air.


Recycle
Recycle cans, bottles, plastic bags, and newspapers. When you recycle, you send less trash to the landfill and you help save natural resources, like trees, oil, and elements such as aluminum.


When You Buy, Buy Cool Stuff
There are lots of ways we can improve the environment. One of the ways to reduce the amount of greenhouse gases that we put into the air is to buy products that don't use as much energy. By conserving energy, we help reduce climate change and make the Earth a better place. Some products – like certain cars and stereos – are made specially to save energy.


Some Things to Think About
Did you know that you can help the environment if you buy recyclable products instead of non-recyclable ones? Look for the recycle mark – three arrows that make a circle – on the package. Recyclable products are usually made out of things that already have been used. It usually takes less energy to make recycled products than to make new ones. The less energy we use, the better.


Solar Energy
Imagine that it's a hot summer day. You put a scoop of ice cream on the sidewalk, and it melts. Why? Well, you probably know that the sun causes the ice cream to melt. But you may not know that the sun produces solar energy. Solar energy is a fancy way of saying "energy that comes from the sun." Solar energy can be used to heat homes, buildings, water, and to make electricity. Today, more than 200,000 houses in the United States take advantage of the sun's energy.


Cars
Cars are an important part of life for most people. But cars also cause pollution and release a lot of greenhouse gases into the air. Fortunately, there are some cars that are better for the environment. These cars can travel longer on a smaller amount of gasoline. They don't pollute as much, either. Using these kinds of cars can help reduce the amount of greenhouse gases in the air.


ENERGY STAR®
Many things, like computers, TVs, stereos, and VCRs, have special labels on them. The label says "Energy" and has a picture of a star. Products with the ENERGY STAR® label are made to save energy. Buying products with ENERGY STAR® labels will help protect the environment.

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24. Youth and Climate Change: Time for ACTION

The youth of today care about OUR future and believe that it is imperative that more is done to ensure a sustainable future for all

Australians use 3.92 billion plastic bags a year, that's over 10 million new bags being used every day. An estimated 3.76 billion bags or 20,700 tonnes of plastic are disposed of in landfill sites throughout Australia every year. Australians dump 7,150 recyclable plastic bags into landfills every minute or 429,000 bags every hour.
Clean Up Australian

Recycling has environmental, economic and social advantages.
• Recycling generates civic pride and environmental awareness.
• Recycling helps prevent environmental pollution.
• Recycling saves natural resources.
• Recycling conserves raw materials used in industry.
• Making products from recycled ingredients often uses much less energy than producing the same product from raw materials.
• Recycling reduces the amount of material dumped in landfill sites and helps our waste disposal problems.
• Goods are used productively and prevented from becoming litter and garbage.
EPA

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25. Stop the Development to build a new "Super-Incinerator" in Coventry

Coventry City Council, in conjunction with Warwickshire County Council and Solihull Council, has proposed plans to build a new “Super-Incinerator”. This has been done without a public consultation and without a waste strategy from Coventry City Council.

This will affect increasing rates of recycling due to the large and steady flow of waste needed for the incinerator to burn so that contractual obligations can be met.

Incineration produces vast amounts of Carbon Dioxide which contributes to climate change and also emitts dioxins and dust particles harmful to human health.

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26. Provide Green Waste collection for Greenhill SA 5140

At present, the Adelaide Hills Council does not provide services for the collection of green waste within the suburb of Greenhill (in South Australia - Postcode 5140).

Given the suburb has relatively high density housing and is in a Bush Fire prone area, it is requested that the Adelaide Hills Council provides these facilities.

The council does provide this service to two suburbs within the council area with similar geography to Greenhill - Woodforde and Teringie - so why not Greenhill?

Residents are currently entitled to an annual voucher for one trailer load to Heathfield or Newton depots and there is limited facilities to dispose of green waste at the CFS Station prior to the start of the bushfire season, however this is not available during the bushfire season for ongoing disposal of leaf litter etc, which is probably the most critical time.

It is requested that Adelaide Hills council investigate & provide either kerbside or centralised collection (perhaps a skip for Green Waste only be placed at the Greenhill CFS Station and emptied periodically by the Council if approved by the Brigade).

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27. Re-use Printer Cartridges

For every kilogram of cartridge plastic up to 2.86 litres of oil is used and 6 kilograms of greenhouse gas are produced in its manufacture.

For every 1 kilogram of cartridge plastic produced the equivalent to 26 kw/h of electricity is used in its creation. This is enough to light a 50w fluorescent tube for 21 days or a 75 w incandescent globe for 14 days.

Compare that energy consumption: 500 cartridges would run a big 4 bedroom house with electric hot water and ducted air-conditioning for one (1) year.

It is estimated that 10 million plus printer cartridges are put into landfill in Australia every year and the number is increasing. By remanufacturing printer cartridges not only does it stop landfill it also reduces Australia's balance of payments through imports of new cartridges.

The Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) Lexmark, HP, Canon, Epson and others are fitting chips and other monitoring devices to the cartridges, the effect of which is to disable the cartridge when it is empty thereby stopping the cartridges from being remanufactured. In this way the owner of the printer is forced to buy new cartridges rather than a cheaper remanufactured cartridge.

The issue of voiding warranty as espoused by the OEM is illegal under the Trade Practices Act and so the threat to not fix a fault in the printer when under warranty because the owner has used a remanufactured cartridge can not be enforced.

From a cost point of view, an owner of a printer is entitled to use his/her device in any way he/she wishes. He/she is entitled to have the cartridge remanufactured if he/she wishes.

An Example:
What is the annual cost savings of a printer that takes a cartridge that prints 5000 pages, needs a new cartridge every 23 working days and costs $350 new but only $230 remanufactured? (savings = $1,356 p.a.)

Why does a $100 printer use 2 x $86 ink cartridges each (1 black, 1 colour) every 200 pages approx.?

By being able to obtain remanufactured cartridges you will save money
You will reduce landfill
You will reduce Australia's Balance of Payments debt
You will employ more Australians in the business of providing remanufacturing services.

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28. Save our weekly rubbish collection service (Kirklees area)

Many local people living in the Kirklees Council area are opposed to council plans to abolish their weekly rubbish collection service.

Labour councillors want to save the weekly grey bin rubbish collection service to keep their areas clean, tidy and free of litter, stop rubbish piling up in streets and gardens, and prevent fly tipping.

Local people have told us they also want to recycle more by increasing the frequency of the green bin collections and have glass collections.

We want to collect signatures for this petition to force Kirklees Council not to axe the weekly rubbish collection service and to help local people to recycle more by increasing the frequency of the green bin collection and glass collection.

Thank you for your support.

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29. CALL TO ACTION FORM - Recycle to Eradicate Poverty

We recycle used cell phones and ink cartridges, or electronic waste, in order to raise funds for micro-finance loans to the poor.

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30. Please implement outdoor recycling depots!

I recently wrote to the City of Kelowna requesting they put outdoor recycling depots in public areas. I asked that they encourage businesses to do the same. I received a reply from:

Eve-Lyn Wolters
Assistant Waste Reduction Coordinator
Regional District of Central Okanagan
1450 KLO Rd.
Kelowna BC V1W 3Z4

Her reply is as follows:

"Thank you for your e-mail. We have just recently begun discussions
about downtown recycling stations/outdoor event recycling availability.
We are testing a few different ways to recover recyclables in outdoor
public areas and hope to put together some recommendations for city
council and the regional board shortly.

We appreciate receiving letters like yours because they demonstrate
public support for these type of initiatives."

Let's show city council and the regional board that we do indeed support this type of initiative!

Curbside recycling has resulted in 40% more recyclable goods making it to the recycle depots. Let's try to make this number even higher! Please sign my petition for outdoor recycling stations. Together we can have a sustainable earth.

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