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1. We Want Work-Life Balance in ASEAN Countries

Many in ASEAN countries are denied jobs and income-generating opportunities, especially many women who were poor, disabled, or caregivers who cannot afford childcare or nursing care for dependents. They do not have many options for employment, thus reducing their chances to gain steady income.

We want to promote work-life balance. This requires policy changes at government and corporation levels to facilitate teleworking, job-sharing, flexi-hours and various forms of working from home.

Such changes would not only produce a happy workforce and enable workers to spend more time with their families and fulfill their parental and filial commitments, but would generate much more income for a country's economy due to higher retention of employees - especially mothers. It would also give job opportunities to those who can't commute to work, or whose hours wasted in travel and traffic jams would reduce quality of life.

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2. Raise Minimum Wage In Idaho To $10.00 Dollars An Hour

Earlier this year, EPI released an analysis of the Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2013, a bill introduced by Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) and Rep. George Miller (D-Calif.) that would raise the federal minimum wage in three incremental increases of $0.95 from its current level of $7.25 per hour to $10.10 per hour (see Cooper and Hall 2013).

The Harkin-Miller proposal would then index the minimum wage to inflation, so that as prices rise in subsequent years, the minimum would automatically be adjusted to preserve its real value. At the same time, the bill would raise the base wage paid to tipped workers from the current $2.13 per hour—where it has stood since 1991—in incremental increases over six years until it equals 70 percent of the full minimum wage.

Since that analysis was released, five states have raised their state minimum wages: California, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island.1 The increases in these states underscore the broad recognition that the current federal minimum wage is too low. These increases slightly alter our earlier estimates of the impact of a federal minimum-wage increase to $10.10 because workers in these states who would have been affected by the federal increase will now have higher wages as a result of their higher state minimums. Yet the conclusion of our previous analysis remains unchanged: Raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016 would lift incomes for millions of American workers and provide a modest boost to U.S. GDP.

SUPPLEMENTARY DATA: State-by-state characteristics of workers who would be affected by increasing the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by July 2016 [PDF]
This paper provides an update to our original analysis that reflects these higher state minimum wages, and changes in economic conditions over the past year. It begins by providing some context for the current minimum wage and the Harkin-Miller proposal, describing how today’s minimum and the proposed new minimum compare with historical benchmarks. It then provides a demographic overview of the workers who would be affected (both directly and indirectly) by raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10. Finally, it details the GDP and job creation effects that would occur as a result of such an increase.

Key findings include:

Raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016 would return the federal minimum wage to roughly the same inflation-adjusted value it had in the late 1960s.

An increase to $10.10 would either directly or indirectly raise the wages of 27.8 million workers, who would receive about $35 billion in additional wages over the phase-in period.

Across the phase-in period of the increase, GDP would grow by about $22 billion, resulting in the creation of roughly 85,000 net new jobs over that period.
The workers who would receive a raise do not fit the stereotypes of low-wage workers:

Among affected workers, the average age is 35 years old, nearly 88 percent are at least 20 years old, and more than a third (34.5 percent) are at least 40 years old.

Of affected workers, about 54 percent work full time, about 69 percent come from families with family incomes less than $60,000, and more than a quarter have children.

The average affected worker earns half of his or her family’s total income.

The minimum wage in context
Every year that the minimum wage remains the same in nominal dollars, inflation slowly erodes its real (i.e., inflation-adjusted) value, leaving minimum-wage workers with a paycheck that cannot buy as much as it did in years past. This, of course, threatens the material well-being of minimum-wage workers in low-income families who rely on every dollar of income just to afford basic necessities.

At the current federal minimum wage of $7.25, a parent who works full time, year round, does not earn enough to be above the federal poverty line. This was not always the case. As shown in Figure A, throughout the 1960s and 1970s, a full-time, full-year minimum-wage income was above the poverty line for a family of two. At its high point in real value in the late 1960s, a full-time, full-year minimum-wage income was enough to keep a family of three above the poverty line, although it still fell shy of the poverty line for a family of four.

FIGURE A
Annual minimum-wage earnings and poverty line for families of two to four, 1964–2013 and projected for 2013–2016 under proposal to raise the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016 (2013 dollars)

Annual minimum-wage earnings and poverty line for families of two to four, 1964–2013 and projected for 2013–2016 under proposal to raise the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016 (2013 dollars).
Note: Poverty thresholds for 2013 for family of two (one adult, one child) and three (two adults, one child) and four (two adults, two children) are inflated from 2012 U.S. Census Bureau thresholds by CBO-projected inflation for 2013. The poverty threshold for one adult, two children is slightly higher ($18,794) than for the family of three configuration shown here. Projections are based upon CBO inflation projections and the proposal to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016. Annual earnings are calculated assuming workers work 40 hours per week, 52 weeks per year.

Source: Author's analysis of Harkin-Miller proposal, U.S. Census Bureau (2012), CBO (2013), and U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division (2013)
The black dotted line in the figure shows what a full-time minimum-wage worker would earn if the minimum wage were raised to $10.10 by 2016, as the Harkin-Miller bill proposes. Such an increase would return a full-time minimum-wage income to a level sufficient to protect a family of three from poverty. Because the Harkin-Miller bill would also index the minimum wage to inflation, full-time minimum-wage workers would never again fall below this threshold.

The declining real value of the minimum wage has also significantly contributed to the enormous growth in U.S. income inequality (Mishel 2013). The gap between the minimum wage and the average wage of typical American workers used to be much smaller than it is today. Figure B depicts the value of the minimum wage as a percentage of the average wage of production, non-supervisory workers. From the mid-1960s up until the early 1980s, minimum-wage workers earned a wage equal to roughly half that of the typical American worker. Today’s minimum wage is equal to only 36 percent of the average production, non-supervisory worker wage. Raising the minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016 would return the minimum wage to roughly 50 percent of the average production worker wage.

FIGURE B
Federal minimum wage as a percentage of the average U.S. wage of production/nonsupervisory workers, 1964–2013 and projected for 2013–2016 under proposal to raise the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by July 2016

Federal minimum wage as a percentage of the average U.S. wage of production/nonsupervisory workers, 1964–2013 and projected for 2013–2016 under proposal to raise the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by July 2016
Source: Author's analysis of Harkin-Miller proposal, Current Population Survey Outgoing Rotation Group microdata, and U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division (2013).

It is important to also recognize that today’s minimum wage has not fallen to exceptional lows out of economic necessity. Over the past 45 years, the U.S. economy has vastly expanded, and productivity (our ability to produce goods and services for the same amount of work) has more than doubled. Yet the minimum wage—our agreed-upon standard for the minimum amount a worker in our society should be paid—has been left to stagnate and decline. Figure C shows the value of the minimum wage since 1968, compared with what it might have been had it grown at the same rate as average wages or total economy productivity (i.e., how much we can produce for an hour’s worth of work).

FIGURE C
Real value of the federal minimum wage, 1968–2013 and 2013–2016 under proposed increase to $10.10 by 2016, compared with its value had it grown at the rate of productivity or average worker wages (2013 dollars)

Real value of the federal minimum wage, 1968–2013 and 2013–2016 under proposed increase to $10.10 by 2016, compared with its value had it grown at the rate of productivity or average worker wages (2013 dollars)
* Productivity and average wage projections from 2013 to 2016 do not include the Harkin-Miller proposal.

Note: Dollars are deflated using CPI-U-RS and CBO inflation projections. Projected wage values are based on CBO inflation projections, average wage and productivity growth from 2002 to 2006 (the last full regular business cycle), and, in the case of the "real minimum wage" line, the proposal to raise the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016.

Source: Author's analysis of Total Economy Productivity data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Labor Productivity and Costs program, BLS Current Employment Statistics, Current Population Survey Outgoing Rotation Group microdata, CBO (2013), U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division (2013), and the Harkin-Miller proposal.

As the figure shows, the minimum wage in 1968 equaled roughly $9.40 in today’s dollars. Had it grown from that point at the same rate as growth in wages for the typical American worker, it would be about $10.65 today, and projected to be about $10.89 by 2016. If the minimum wage had grown at the same rate as productivity, it would be $18.30 today, and close to $19 per hour by 2016 (under reasonable expectations for productivity growth). As depicted by the dotted black line, the Harkin-Miller proposal to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016 would lift the minimum to just above its real value from 1968 (in 2013 dollars)—a worthwhile improvement, yet still well below what the economy could sustain, given economic growth and technological progress since that time.

Demographic characteristics of affected workers
Increasing the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour by 2016 would lift incomes for millions of American workers, most of whom do not fit the prevailing impressions of low-wage workers as teenagers working part-time jobs for extra spending money. Figure D shows the number of workers who would be directly and indirectly affected in each year of the proposed incremental increases.

FIGURE D
Number of workers (in millions) affected by raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by July 2016

Number of workers (in millions) affected by raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by July 2016
Source: Author's analysis of Harkin-Miller proposal using Current Population Survey Outgoing Rotation Group microdata
With the initial increase to $8.20 per hour, 7.0 million workers would be directly affected. These are workers who currently earn between $7.25 and $8.20 per hour. Another 2.7 million workers with wages just above $8.20 per hour would be indirectly affected by the “ripple effect” of the increase, receiving a raise as employers adjust their overall pay ladders (Shierholz 2009). In the second year, as the federal minimum wage is increased to $9.15 per hour, 11.1 million workers would be directly affected, and another 6.5 million would be indirectly affected. In the final increase to $10.10 one year later, a total of 27.8 million American workers would see their pay increase, with 16.7 million workers directly affected and another 11.1 million indirectly affected.

We now examine the demographic characteristics—in terms of gender, age, work hours, family income, and family composition—of the workers who would be directly and indirectly affected.

Gender

While raising the minimum wage would benefit both men and women, it would disproportionately affect women. As depicted in Figure E, women account for 49.2 percent of total U.S. employment, yet comprise 55.0 percent of the workers whose incomes would rise by increasing the minimum wage to $10.10. The share of those affected who are women varies somewhat by state, from a low of 47.7 percent in California to a high of 63.3 percent in Mississippi.

FIGURE E
Gender distribution of workers affected by raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by July 2016, and of total employment

Gender distribution of workers affected by raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by July 2016, and of total employment
Source: Author's analysis of Harkin-Miller proposal using Current Population Survey Outgoing Rotation Group microdata and BLS Current Employment Statistics (2013)
Age

Perhaps the most common incorrect perception of low-wage workers is that they are largely teenagers and almost entirely young people. While there certainly are a number of low-wage workers who fit this description, young workers comprise only a small fraction of the workers who would be affected by an increase to $10.10. Of the workers who would receive a raise if the minimum wage were lifted to $10.10 by 2016, only 12.5 percent are teens. In fact, of those affected, more are age 55 or older than are teenagers. The average age among affected workers is 35 years old, more than half of all affected workers are at least 30, and more than a third (34.5 percent) are at least 40 (see Figure F).

FIGURE F
Age of workers affected by raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by July 2016
Age of workers affected by raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by July 2016
Source: Author's analysis of Harkin-Miller proposal using Current Population Survey Outgoing Rotation Group microdata

Work hours
Among those who would be affected by increasing the minimum wage to $10.10, only 14.2 percent work fewer than 20 hours per week. As seen in Figure G, more than half (53.8 percent) work full time (35 or more hours per week), and 32.0 percent work between 20 and 34 hours per week.

FIGURE G Interactive
Work status of workers affected by raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by July 2016

Share of affected workers
Part time (< 20 hours) 14.2%
Mid time (20-34 hours) 32.0%
Full time (35+ hours) 53.8%
Part time (< 20 hours): 14.2%
Mid time (20-34 hours): 32.0%
Full time (35+ hours): 53.8%
Source: Author's analysis of Harkin-Miller proposal using Current Population Survey Outgoing Rotation Group microdata
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The report’s supplementary state tables (available at http://www.epi.org/files/2013/minimum-wage-state-tables.pdf) provide demographic information on affected workers by state. The data show that Southern states tend to have higher shares of affected workers who work full time. Arkansas (66.1 percent), Louisiana (65.4 percent), Texas (64.0 percent), and Georgia (62.2 percent) have the highest shares, with more than 60 percent of affected individuals working full time. States in New England and the Midwest have the smallest shares of affected workers who work full time, with Connecticut (36.4 percent), Minnesota (38.3 percent), and New Hampshire (39.3 percent) having shares below 40 percent.

Family income

Those who would be affected come largely from families with low to moderate income levels. As shown in Figure H, 68.9 percent of affected workers have total family incomes of less than $60,000 per year, and nearly a quarter (23.1 percent) have family incomes below $20,000 per year. Among all U.S. families, the median family income in 2012 was $62,527 (according to data from the American Community Survey), which means that nearly 70 percent of affected workers come from families in the bottom half of the income distribution.

FIGURE H
Family income of workers affected by raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by July 2016

Family income of workers affected by raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by July 2016
Source: Author's analysis of Harkin-Miller proposal using Current Population Survey Outgoing Rotation Group microdata
The share of workers affected by increasing the federal minimum wage to $10.10 with family income below $60,000 varies considerably by state, ranging from a low of 46.9 percent in New Hampshire to a high of 80.2 percent in Montana (and 80.4 percent in the District of Columbia).

Low- and minimum-wage workers are often dismissed as “secondary earners,” implying that the income earned by these workers is primarily discretionary income, unessential to their family’s well-being. This is patently false: The workers who would be affected by increasing the minimum wage to $10.10 earn, on average, 50 percent of their family’s total income. As shown in Figure I, this percentage varies from a low of 32.9 percent in New Hampshire to a high of 60.3 percent in Louisiana.

FIGURE I Interactive
Average share of family income provided by worker affected by raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016, by state

State Share
New Hampshire 32.9%
Connecticut 35.6%
New Jersey 38.7%
Maryland 39.1%
Vermont 39.3%
Alaska 39.5%
Massachusetts 39.8%
Minnesota 41.0%
Rhode Island 41.3%
Pennsylvania 41.7%
Maine 42.6%
Hawaii 42.9%
Utah 43.4%
Wisconsin 43.9%
Washington 45.4%
Ohio 45.8%
Iowa 45.9%
Michigan 46.0%
Illinois 46.1%
Nebraska 46.3%
New York 46.8%
Delaware 46.8%
Virginia 46.8%
North Dakota 47.1%
Colorado 47.4%
Indiana 48.0%
Nevada 48.7%
United States 50.0%
Oregon 50.1%
Missouri 50.2%
Arizona 51.7%
Idaho 51.7%
Wyoming 52.2%
New Mexico 53.2%
California 53.2%
South Dakota 53.4%
South Carolina 54.0%
Tennessee 54.1%
Florida 54.4%
West Virginia 54.6%
Kentucky 55.0%
Kansas 55.1%
Alabama 55.2%
Montana 55.4%
Georgia 55.5%
Texas 55.7%
North Carolina 56.3%
Mississippi 57.0%
Oklahoma 57.1%
Arkansas 58.9%
District of Columbia 59.8%
Louisiana 60.3%
......

Source: Author's analysis of Harkin-Miller proposal using Current Population Survey Outgoing Rotation Group microdata
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Family composition

Nationally, more than a quarter (26.5 percent) of those who would be affected by increasing the minimum wage to $10.10 are parents. In fact, of the nation’s roughly 75 million children, nearly one-fifth (18.7 percent) have at least one parent who would receive a raise if the minimum wage were increased to $10.10. This percentage varies from 10.8 percent in Alaska (and 9.7 percent in the District of Columbia) to 25.7 percent in Texas, as shown in Figure J. Including Texas, there are 12 states where more than one-fifth of children have a parent who would benefit from the minimum-wage increase: Idaho (25.0 percent), Arkansas (24.6 percent), South Carolina (24.1 percent), Louisiana (23.3 percent), Kentucky (22.3 percent), North Carolina (21.9 percent), Florida (21.3 percent), Alabama (21.0 percent), Tennessee (20.9 percent), Utah (20.7 percent), and Nevada (20.3 percent). Of these 12 states, all but Idaho, Utah, and Nevada had child poverty rates of 25 percent or more in 2012 (Annie E. Casey Foundation 2013).

FIGURE J Interactive
Share of children with at least one parent affected by raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by July 2016, by state

State name Share of state kids
District of Columbia 9.7%
Alaska 10.8%
Connecticut 11.0%
Maine 11.9%
Vermont 12.1%
Washington 12.3%
New Hampshire 12.8%
Minnesota 13.0%
Maryland 13.4%
Wyoming 13.7%
North Dakota 13.8%
New Jersey 13.9%
Massachusetts 14.3%
Oregon 14.7%
Michigan 14.9%
Hawaii 15.0%
Oklahoma 15.3%
New York 15.9%
New Mexico 16.3%
Iowa 16.8%
Colorado 17.0%
Nebraska 17.0%
Wisconsin 17.2%
West Virginia 17.6%
California 17.6%
Arizona 17.9%
Rhode Island 18.2%
Pennsylvania 18.4%
United States 18.7%
Delaware 18.9%
Indiana 18.9%
Illinois 18.9%
Kansas 19.0%
South Dakota 19.1%
Virginia 19.1%
Georgia 19.3%
Ohio 19.4%
Montana 19.6%
Mississippi 19.6%
Missouri 19.9%
Nevada 20.3%
Utah 20.7%
Tennessee 20.9%
Alabama 21.0%
Florida 21.3%
North Carolina 21.9%
Kentucky 22.3%
Louisiana 23.3%
South Carolina 24.1%
Arkansas 24.6%
Idaho 25.0%
Texas 25.7%
.....

Source: Author's analysis of Harkin-Miller proposal using Current Population Survey Outgoing Rotation Group microdata
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Raising the minimum wage to spur economic growth
As explained in our original analysis of the Harkin-Miller proposal (Cooper and Hall 2013), raising the minimum wage would provide immediate benefits not only to affected workers (whose incomes would rise), but to the broader economy as well. Research over the past two decades has shown that, despite skeptics’ claims, modest increases in the minimum wage have little to no negative impact on jobs2 (Schmitt 2013). In fact, under current labor market conditions, where tepid consumer demand is a major factor holding businesses back from expanding their payrolls, raising the minimum wage can provide a catalyst for new hiring.

Economists generally agree that low-wage workers are more likely than any other income group to spend any additional earnings they receive, largely because they must in order to meet their basic needs. Higher-income individuals, corporations, and beneficiaries of corporate profits are more likely to save at least a portion of any additional income. Thus, in a period of depressed consumer demand, raising the minimum wage can provide a modest boost to overall economic activity because it shifts income to workers who are very likely to spend it immediately. Indeed, recent research from the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago finds that raising the federal minimum wage to $10 could increase U.S. GDP by up to 0.3 percentage points in the near term3 (Aaronson and French 2013).

Our research shows that raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016 would provide an additional $35 billion in wages over the phase-in period to directly and indirectly affected workers, who are likely to then spend that additional income. This projected rise in consumer spending would provide a modest boost to U.S. GDP, even after accounting for the increased labor cost to businesses and the potential for small price increases for consumers. Using standard fiscal multipliers, we would expect that increasing the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $10.10 would generate a net increase in economic activity of $22.1 billion over the phase-in period. This additional GDP would support roughly 85,000 new jobs.4 As shown in Appendix Table 1, increasing the federal minimum wage would generate jobs in every state. (As noted previously, detailed state-level demographic information on each state’s affected workers is available at http://www.epi.org/files/2013/minimum-wage-state-tables.pdf.) Appendix Table 2 details the economic effects of each of the three incremental increases.

Conclusion
Since our original analysis of the Harkin-Miller proposal, five states—California, Connecticut, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island—have adopted higher state minimum wages. By 2014, 21 states plus the District of Columbia will have set minimum wages above the federal minimum of $7.25. At that point, roughly half the U.S. workforce will be in jurisdictions with minimum wages above the federal minimum.

These increases in these states, along with those in several cities and counties that have also implemented higher local minimum wages, underscore the growing recognition that the federal minimum wage of $7.25 is no longer an adequate wage floor. While these recent state-level increases—particularly California’s increase to $10 in 2015—slightly alter our original estimates, our conclusion remains the same: Raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 by 2016 would lift the incomes of millions of working families, boosting their spending power at a time when the U.S. economy is in dire need of increased consumer spending.

Data and Information referenced from: http://www.epi.org/publication/raising-federal-minimum-wage-to-1010/

By David Cooper | December 19, 2013

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3. Governments should support Australian businesses

Recently, Australian company Rossi, lost a contract to supply boots for the Australian Army, to an overseas Company.

It is also believed that the government will get the next order of submarines from Japan, not to made in Adelaide.

Even our last Olympic uniforms were made overseas.

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4. Grant permission for Australian citizen Edwina Evans to work and live in the UK

Edwina Anne Evans was born in Malaysia in 1962 to parents both holding passports listing them as 'British Subjects'. Her father was serving with the Royal Australian Airforce but had previously worked with the RAF as a pilot on the Berlin Airlift.

Edwina has had conflicting advice from the British Immigration Office. A first response was as she was born as a British Subject in a British Colony before 1963 she would qualify for British Citizenship. After sending her Malaysian birth certificate she was then told that as her birth was registered in Penang she didn't qualify as Penang had gained independence from Malaya. This seems to be incorrect as although Penang did try to gain independence it did not succeed and when Malaya gained independence its citizens retained the Citizen of the UK status until 1963.

Edwina has visited the UK many times and would dearly love to be able to work and live here. She wants no access to public funds, just the right to be able to make a living in the country she loves. Edwina is of good character and holds a top security clearance with her employment in Australia.

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5. Demand SOLS Be Removed

We petition the government to work with the Department of Education to remove the SOlS. The State and Federal governments should be the one's in charge of students education. It would also help the economy because then you wouldn't need a "Department of Education".

Under the "No child left behind" Act students have been pressured to only pass SOLS, have had courses on how to pass them and even students scores affect how much (if any) of a pay increase teachers get.

We Demand that SOLS be removed and speak for the overwhelming majority of Americans that want to get rid of SOLS.

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6. Employee Hiring Reform

It's time to end the circle of unemployment for unexperienced people. Everyone has at least once in their life been denied a trivial job due to lack of experience.

It's time for the government to step in and mandate a change whereby employers can no longer refuse someone a job based on their experience unless the job truly requires experience and/or proven skills required to do the job.

For example, being denied a job stocking shelves in a supermarket because you have no experience is ludicrous.

"I can't get a job because I have no experience because I can't get a job." - Thousands of unemployed.

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7. Work for Felons

This Petition is for Non-Violent felons to successfully reintegrate in society as productive citizens of their community.

Stop recidivism and boost the economy.

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8. Support jobs for the future in Cowra

Cowra has just had another large business close, which put 70 people out of work. Many small businesses are struggling, and unemployment has increased.

Local people are very concerned with our future.

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9. Ambassadors, Activists, NGO's and trade experts for a Global AntiCorruption Network

The nazis are coming? journalists and scientists across the globe are targeted after discovering the hazards of chemicals in the air and in our food due to chemtrails from war (bombs) and dirty fuel.

We ask for our human right to live together peacefully with a New World Organization.

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10. HELP AN INNOCENT MAN GET HIS EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE THAT HE PAID INTO

JEAN-GUY GOES IN FRONT OF THE EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE BOARD FIGHTING FOR HIS EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE BENEFITS ON THRUSDAY APRIL 25TH... HE HAS BEEN REFUSED....

HE PAID INTO THESE BENEFITS BEFORE HE WENT TO JAIL FOR A CRIME HE DID NOT COMMIT SO I NEED PEOPLE TO SIGN THIS NEW PETITION STATING THEY THINK HE SHOULD HAVE THEM SINCE HE HAS LOOKED FOR WORK 28+ PLACES SINCE HE WAS RELEASED& BECAUSE HE DID JAIL FOR A CRIME HE DID NOT COMMIT AND IT IS CURRENTLY GOING TO BE APPEALED IN JUNE FROM WHAT THE APPEAL LAWYER IS SAYING.

ALSO HE HAS TRIED TO GO BACK TO HIS EMPLOYER BUT THEY ARE SAYING NO WORK BUT THEY ARE ALSO HIRING PEOPLE....

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11. Stop McDonald's Employees from Having to Work Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day

The Holidays are days of the year set aside, designated to spend with our friends and loved ones. All year we work hard to support ourselves and our families and we sacrifice our time with them in order to do so.

We look forward to Holidays in order to take a step back and appreciate those in our lives. Yet employees at select McDonald's locations will not receive that time. These McDonald's locations will be remaining open and in business 24 hours on Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, as well as New Years Eve and New Years Day.

These employees are students, mothers, fathers, sons, and daughters who will not get to experience the joys of the holidays with their own families because of the greediness of the McDonald's Corporation. Please help those employees, who remain loyal to McDonald's, to be given the Holidays with their families.

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12. PLEASE create a NEW Star Trek TV Series!!!! :)

The WORLD, as you can see... MISSES having a Star Trek SERIES! :)

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13. Petition on the recent changes to Unemployment Insurance eligibility criteria:

Petition to the House of Commons in Parliament Assembled:

We, the undersigned residents of Canada, draw attention of the House to the following:

THAT the government of Canada has recently made changes to the eligibility requirements for unemployment insurance (UI);

THAT these changes have been made behind closed doors without any input from the ordinary Canadian citizens who are affected by such policies and these changes will negatively affect the livelihood of numerous Canadians;

THAT the adopted changes will negatively impact Canadians nation wide, in particular they will impact those Canadians who live in rural areas in which the economy is dependent upon seasonal employment.

We feel that the adopted changes to the unemployment eligibility criteria will force people out of their specialized occupations into unskilled, low wage jobs. In addition, we agree that Canadian individuals will be forced to look for employment at great distances outside their area of residence causing them to incur unreasonable time commitments and travel costs.

Combined, we feel these changes may lead to increased poverty for unemployed individuals as well as the families which they support.

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14. 24 hr Gold Coast KFC

Working years in late night hospitality, Ive become tired of the late night kebab being my main source of energy.

The thousands of us that work during the part of the day/night that everyone else spends either sleeping or partying have been left with very little option for food after work. Kebab's and McDonalds just don't cut it anymore.

We want late night KFC!!

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15. Stop temporary agencies

1 in 10 Canadians in the workforce who are employed are working in what would be considered temporary job.

Between 1989 and 1994, the number of Canadians employed on a temporary basis increased by 21 per cent, from 799,000 to 970,000 workers.

Seventy-five per cent of temporary jobs last less than six months and as a result, many temporary workers are excluded from various legal protections and employee benefits.

Temporary agents are not paid for days away from the job due to sickness, statutory holidays, bereavement or vacation leave, nor are they entitled to severance pay upon termination of their employment.

Employers are not required to pay unemployment insurance premiums or Canada/Quebec Pension Plan premiums on behalf of these workers.

Temporary employment is an important issue with substantial policy implications. Too many workers today are unable to string together enough temporary jobs in a year to provide them with an adequate income or security. Moving from one contract to the next, many individuals are left with only part-time work and irregular hours, and rarely with any of the non-wage benefits like pensions or unemployment insurance.

Clearly the emergence of these new forms of employment has implications for a wide range of policies and programs.

In short, temporary employment in some of its current forms is eroding the economic security of Canadian families.

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16. Let Us Work: Support a Luxury Resort and Casino in Hardeeville, SC

This petition supports the proposed Luxury Resort and Casino in Hardeeville, SC.

We believe this addition would be a perfect fit to the hospitality and tourism atmosphere in the Low Country.

Furthermore we believe the latter proposed would give a much needed economic lift to the surrounding area and provide a good foundation for steady future growth.

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17. Show The Real Unemployment Numbers

Let's finally get the real numbers out there. The administration wants to put out all these fake numbers and say the unemployment rate drops, but fail to mention all the people who ran out of benefits or no longer are looking for work because they can not find any.

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18. UK Disabled Community Against Welfare & Benefit Cuts

The UK Disabled Community needs to send a clear and unequivocal message in one unified voice to call on the Coalition Government to see us all as equal members of society and not treat us as a tool to steal our disability benefits and services to bail out the Country in this time of Financial Crisis.

Can we set a precedence to get 1 million signatures so that the Coalition Government will have no option but to take note of us and not just ignore or deflect our arguments & comments and to stop building this climate of hate against disabled people.

Please leave a question for your Local MP to pose to the Coalition Government, which we will add to the Petition when we deliver it to No.10.

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19. Reduce damage to wildlife in Devon

Picture a beautiful scene of nature and fields providing a home to millions of animals and birds. Imagine that this is also a home and livelihood for farmers and provides jobs for many other people too. There is such a place near where I live and now the Council wish to build a town here called Cranbrook.

Unless I get enough signatures here, they will be building to their original plans, and destroying the homes, jobs and livelihoods of both wildlife and people with bulldozers. While it is far too late to stop the building altogether, it is not too late for the Council to reduce their plans to build here. This would also be dangerous since they plan to build homes and other buildings there on the flood plains.

They say that this is necessary to reduce homelessness and to create jobs, but this is untrue because homelessness can be reduced by turning suitable old buildings into houses and work buildings, as well as reducing the housing costs. How would you like to be a wild animal and have your home destroyed for "economic reasons"?

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20. Bring Back The Tumblr Directory

A lot of us have put so much effort into getting into the directory, and now it has been wasted.

The feature has also been great for new people, as it gives them a good place to find people to follow.

We don’t want tumblr to remove explore, we just want the directory back.

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21. Bring back Work Experience for ALL

I, and the other people who signed this think that everyone should get the chance to have some work experience. Up until last year, forth years at my school got work experience but from now on they will not receive it.

It seems unfair that it has been cut. Work experience should be offered to all so we can learn what a job is like and see if the subjects we have chosen are correct for the subject. if we do not enjoy our time at work experience we might be able to choose different subjects.

This is why I think work experience is very important and should be brought back to ALL.

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22. Eliminate The California At-Will Employment Law

California's "at-will" Employment Law that Several States have adopted, allows Employers to Terminate an Employee with or without notice AND with or without any cause or reason.

We, California Citizens believe this Law proves that TITLE II of The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (These Rights are Being Violated) AND that under The 14th Amendment of The United States Constitution for Equal Protection of The Law.

Furthermore, This Provision of Employment Law, upon Termination of an Employee does not authorize the terminated employee to invoke the right to appeal to Employer Superiors in writing.

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23. A Living Wage for Southwark's workers

Cleaners, carers and other people working for Southwark Council contracts are currently paid less than the basic amount you need to get by in London - the London Living Wage. This is currently £7.85 per hour, or about £15,000 a year.

In 2008 the Green Party introduced a policy, supported by the Labour Party, to pay workers the living wage as contracts came up. But it has never been implemented.

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24. Stop welfare fraud in Canada

They have recently cut the E.I. rates 5 weeks, these are people who have worked in some of the most menial jobs in Canada.

People on welfare never have to report anything such as change etc. children shipped off to their grandmother yet they get welfare and free education forever from the government, we pay their tuition fees, they don't even pass their courses or they drop them or don't show up.

Cut off the welfare fraud cases and give it to EI.

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25. Stop the Proposed Changes to ESA

New even harsher plans have been proposed for the Employment and Support Allowance in the UK. These will cause considerably more hardship for already vulnerable and disabled claimants. For more details go to http://www.benefitsandwork.co.uk.

We successfully fought to stop the termination of the Disability Living Allowance and we can also fight to stop these new ESA proposals. This petition is part of the campaign to prevent these new proposals from passing into law.

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26. Equality for all drivers who need their licence for work

This Petition is for all that have been or may still be effected by the current disruption in services by drive test.

This disruption has effected many of our youth and young adults who need their licence for work as well many other day to day uses.

The government and Union need to realize that drive test should be available to all drivers who need its services for work.

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27. Support the Single Parent Employment Discrimination Act (SPEDA)

A petition to support SPEDA, the Single Parent Employment Discrimination Act to offer Single Parents the same protection offered to other minorities.

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28. Save the American People in a Recession

We are in a recession and bailing out companies with the Americans' tax dollars and it's not working. The Government wants health care reform by hiking up all the taxes which we the American people already pay.

If the average American got this stimulus package it would give them the ability to pay their debt ie, Mortgages, loans, medical and dental expenses, educational expenses. It would allow us the freedom to spend money on insurance for our family's, send our children through college, avoid foreclosures, repo's, the seniors could pay their outstanding medical bills and get out of debt which would regenerate the economy by putting the money back into the lending companies, banks, government and other companies big and small.

We bailed out the Corp Company's now it's time to start back at ground zero with the little people that work at the stores, secretaries, medical offices, teachers, etc. Some even don't have jobs anymore due to this recession and have lost everything they have worked so hard for, we are having to decide weather to feed our children or pay a loan, to pay our car payments or keep a roof over our heads, these are not easy decision but we are having to face them.

I purpose that we get a Financial Stimulus taxed package ranging from $100.000 per single family to $250.000 for a two parent household based on an annual income range from $70.000 or less. We need help now not later. It's time to make a change for the American people.

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29. Give asylum seekers the right to work

PETITION SUMMARY

Without the right to work, asylum seekers are paralyzed economically, psychologically, intellectually and socially. This leads us to confusion which leads to stress and eventually to extreme forms of depression. It feels like the government has given up on our lives. This has a negative impact on the progression of the nation and giving up on the lives of asylum seekers feels like giving up on the nation.

“My name is Adam and I come from Darfur, Sudan. I would like to tell you about the Brighter Futures’ campaign for asylum seekers to have the right to work. I want to tell you about this because I know what life looks like for people like me who escaped from genocide in Darfur. The Home Office takes too long to decide our cases – and when you know your story is true this is very hard. This means you’re just staying at home, and you get bored with the TV. You can’t work – you see yourself growing up but you can’t do anything with your life. We’d like permission to work for everyone who’s been here for more than six months. If they don’t change this today, tomorrow for me will be too late.” Adam Teneh, 19, from Darfur

Brighter Futures is a self advocacy group for young asylum seekers and refugees, who are campaigning for all young asylum seekers aged 16 and over to have the right to work from six months after arriving in the UK. Brighter Futures is also calling for the Home Office to make it easier for young asylum seekers who do have the right to work to prove this.

We believe asylum seekers should have the right to work because:

• We need financial independence to satisfy our basic needs such as food, shelter, transport and education.
• We can then contribute to the economy through taxes.
• We can then relieve the burden on the benefits system.
• We can then integrate better with our local communities.
• We can change the image of asylum seekers - we want human dignity and respect.
• It enables the Government to reduce social problems such as asylum seekers being exploited by having to work illegally.

Finally, we get to grow financially, intellectually, emotionally and in confidence - as every human being has the right to for a brighter future.

We hope that this petition will compel the government to take a positive policy decision rather than believing the myths about asylum seekers. If the government truly believes in human rights, they must understand that not being able to work feels like the loss of our lives. Understanding the situation and taking into account these issues, we hope you will support our campaign.

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30. Online petition to internationally scrap homework

For a long time homework has taken up the time of school attendees and made them miserable... I believe this should change!

If schools can't teach us in the time we have something is wrong!

Join the revolution!!!

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